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New Book ‘The Velocity of Information’ Discovers Humans’ Breaking Point During Chaos

MADISON, Wis. -- "The Velocity of Information - Human Thinking During Chaotic Times" (ISBN: 978-1475865455), authored by David P. Perrodin, Ph.D., and published by Rowman & Littlefield, rigorously clarifies and deepens how we think about societal human behavior and mental health during days, weeks, months, or even years of chaos. This is an invigorating scholarly work for all audiences.

As chaos erupts, alerts screech on our cell phones and torrents of conflicting-yet-urgent messages gush from media outlets. What is the magnitude of the crisis? What is its cause? And what should people do to protect themselves?

The speed and direction of these details is known as the velocity of information. It overwhelms and distresses people who have not built a network of trustworthy sources to traverse disorder.

"'The Velocity of Information' offers understanding to manage chaos and our complex reactions to crisis situations influenced by bias and propaganda," explains Dr. Perrodin. "Recognizing indicators to judge the severity of an incident, understanding human predispositions, and joining a member check network to gauge real-time observations from people in your network provide direction to respond to the reality of a situation with impartiality, thus improving outcomes."

This book also provides a novel framework, incorporating photos and custom figures, for discerning chaos based on duration, location, and complexity. Understanding how human cognitive limitations affect individual and group human behavior during different stages of chaos allows readers to use the tools in this book to avoid hysteria and optimize responses to emergency events.

Utilizing several in-depth personal interviews and explorations of historical and contemporary events, "The Velocity of Information" provides a functional and realistic roadmap with specific, actionable guidance on how to navigate chaos.

James David Dickson, reporter, The Detroit News, says, "David P. Perrodin's 'Velocity of Information' will empower its readers. Drawing on current events, history, interviews, and scholarship, Velocity of Information is an education in the way people react and adapt to change in this fast-spinning world. Never has it been more important to sift facts and stories for truth and meaning. The path forward is lit by Dr. Perrodin's assemblage of homesteaders and Special Forces fighters, of crab boaters, jewel thieves and Nail Men. There are teachable moments on every page."

Link to Publisher:

https://rowman.com/ISBN/9781475865455/The-Velocity-of-Information-Human-Thinking-During-Chaotic-Times

About the Author:

David P. Perrodin, Ph.D., is an author, researcher, professor, and host of "The Safety Doc" podcast. Dr. Perrodin is a speech-language pathologist specializing in psycholinguistics. He has presented on PBS and written and directed a film about school safety with Pulitzer Prize winner David Obst. Dr. Perrodin is the author of the book School of Errors: Rethinking School Safety in America. He can be found at https://safetyphd.com/.

MULTIMEDIA:

VIDEO (YouTube): https://youtu.be/LKMEjx4oqME

Related link: https://safetyphd.com/

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Disparaged US President Herbert Hoover Was a Great Humanitarian

DENVER, Colo. -- Herbert Hoover's fall from grace during his presidency (1928-1932) has been well documented, but his initial rise to greatness -- when he became known to the world as a Great Humanitarian -- has all but been forgotten, according to "Yanks behind the Lines" (ISBN 978-1538141649; Rowman & Littlefield) author Jeffrey B. Miller, who is the first historian in more than thirty years to focus his three award-winning nonfiction books on Hoover's WWI efforts in German-occupied Belgium.

On October 22, 1914, less than three months after the start of World War I, successful mining engineer Herbert Hoover founded in London the Commission for Relief in Belgium (CRB). The CRB with its Belgian counterpart, the Comité National (CN), created the largest food relief program the world had ever since -- saving from starvation for the four years of war nearly 10 million civilians trapped behind German lines. The relief cost nearly $1 billion WWI dollars ($24 billion in 2021).

One of America's finest hours in humanitarian relief was made possible by CRB "delegates," neutral American volunteers who went into German-occupied Belgium to guarantee the Germans did not take the food and ensure fair distribution to all civilians. The youngest U.S. delegate was only 19 years old.

Ultimately, the CRB helped change the way Americans saw themselves and how the world saw America.

Margaret Hoover, host of PBS's Firing Line with Margaret Hoover and great granddaughter of Herbert Hoover, says "It will be a revelation for many Americans to discover Jeff Miller's excellent account of the 'piratical state organized for benevolence,' which helped position the United States as a moral force for good in the world at the outbreak of the twentieth century's first world war."

"Yanks behind the Lines: How the Commission for Relief in Belgium Saved Millions from Starvation during World War I" chronicles the CRB, the CRB delegates, and Belgium under the harsh German rule.

The book is a 2021 Publishers Weekly Editor's Pick, a Colorado Humanities 2021 Colorado Book Award winner, a finalist in four national contests, and Kirkus Reviews declares, "This is a powerful work of history . . . An impressive blend of painstaking historical scholarship and riveting storytelling."

About the author, the book, and the publisher:

Based in Denver, Colo., Jeffrey B. Miller is a journalist and independent historian who has spent the last 10 years researching and writing about the CRB, CN, and German-occupied Belgium. "Yanks behind the Lines" is a fascinating summary of the CRB story. Structured thematically with chapters dedicated to all the critical issues, the book contains individual personal stories that are interwoven into the big picture to create a compelling read about this little-known but hugely important humanitarian program. Rowman & Littlefield publishes high-quality college texts, entertaining and informative books for general readers, and professional and scholarly books in the humanities and social sciences.

MULTIMEDIA:

*VIDEO: 2.5-minute Book Trailer: https://youtu.be/x0u_ijwC2KA

Related link: https://wwicrusaders.com/

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A Little-known WWI Anniversary Celebrates America’s Humanitarian Roots

DENVER, Colo. -- On Oct. 22, 1914, less than three months after the start of World War I, one of the largest food-relief programs the world has ever seen was begun when the Commission for Relief in Belgium (CRB) was founded in London by a group of prominent Americans, according to Jeffrey B. Miller, author of a new nonfiction book, "Yanks behind the Lines: How the Commission for Relief in Belgium Saved Millions from Starvation during World War I" (ISBN 978-1538141649; Rowman & Littlefield). The book chronicles the CRB, the CRB delegates, and Belgium under the harsh German rule.

The CRB, working with its counterpart in Belgium, the Comite National (CN), fed nearly 10 million Belgians and northern French behind German lines for four years as the "Great War" took the lives of more than 9 million soldiers. The CRB bought, shipped and delivered food through an English blockade into German-occupied Belgium. Thirty to 50 relief ships were in transit every day. From Rotterdam the food was transferred to more than 300 canal barges and brought into Belgium via its canal system. The food was then distributed by more than 40,000 Belgians working with the CN.

"Americans were enthusiastic supporters of the CRB in 1914. Today few have heard the name, let alone the story," says Miller.

The CRB was founded and led by Herbert C. Hoover, who became known after the war as the "Great Humanitarian," and later became America's 31st president (1929-1933), in part because of his leadership of the CRB and the post-war American Relief Administration (ARA). The privately operated CRB was funded by worldwide donations and government subsidies from America, Britain, France and Belgium and spent nearly $1 billion in 1914 dollars (approximately $25 billion today).

"This was a much more lasting and complex and diplomatically unprecedented initiative than anything that might arise from a temporary crisis," says George H. Nash, Hoover biographer and author of several volumes about him. "The CRB/CN relief effort was organized across the entire country of Belgium; every community was fed, every civilian had to receive assistance. That's what makes the CRB stand apart from everything that came before it in the way of humanitarian intervention."

Ultimately, the CRB also helped change the way Americans saw themselves and how the world saw America.

"The CRB is significant to everybody who cares about humanitarian relief because it was a turning point in history," says Margaret Hoover, great-granddaughter of Hoover and host of PBS's Firing Line with Margaret Hoover. "It was the moment where international relief became operationally effective on such a massive scale. Nobody had thought that an individual could take on the feeding of an entire nation in the middle of a world war. This totally transformed what America realized it could do in terms of its own role in the world. America had a role in the world-not only to achieve success and freedom and welfare for its own people, but then it could give back to the rest of the world."

That shift in perspective happened not only in America but around the world. "The good will and humanitarian aid created by the CRB's work-and later by the work of the American Relief Administration after the war-engendered a worldwide feeling that America could be a benefactor of humanitarian aid on a scale never seen before," says Branden Little, scholar of humanitarian relief and professor of history at Weber State University in Ogden, Utah.

For Hoover personally, the CRB meant a transformation from successful mining engineer to a man admired around the world. According to historian Nash, "Hoover became an international hero. How were people becoming heroes in WWI? Mostly as soldiers on the battlefield, or great generals organizing victories on the battlefields, or civilian world leaders. Hoover made his reputation not by killing people or organizing warfare, but by saving people from the consequences of warfare."

About the author, the book, and the publisher:

Based in Denver, Colo., Jeffrey B. Miller is a journalist and public historian who has written three books that were named Best Books of the Year (one with Publishers Weekly, two with Kirkus Reviews). He has spent the last 10 years researching and writing about the CRB, CN, and German-occupied Belgium. "Yanks behind the Lines" summarizes the story of the CRB thematically with chapters dedicated to all the critical issues. Individual personal stories are interwoven into the big picture to create a compelling read about this little-known but hugely important humanitarian program.

Rowman & Littlefield publishes high-quality college texts, entertaining and informative books for general readers, and professional and scholarly books in the humanities and social sciences.

Learn more: https://YanksBehindTheLines.com/

Twitter: @WWICrusaders

MEDIA CONTACT:

Author: Jeffrey B. Miller, 1-303-503-1739, jbmwriter@aol.com

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield, pr@rowman.com; https://www.rowman.com

MULTIMEDIA:

*VIDEO: 2.5-minute Book Trailer: https://youtu.be/x0u_ijwC2KA

*PHOTO 1: https://www.Send2Press.com/300dpi/20-1009s2p-yanks-cover-300dpi.jpg

*Photo 1 Caption: Front cover for "Yanks behind the Lines" (Rowman & Littlefield) by Jeffrey B. Miller.

*PHOTO 2: https://www.send2press.com/300dpi/20-1009s2p-yanks-elderly-300dpi.jpg

*Photo 2 Caption: Elderly Man Photo: By September 1914, Belgians throughout the country had no choice but to join the soup-kitchen lines as the country quickly consumed its dwindling supplies.

Related link: https://YanksBehindTheLines.com/

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