Free News Articles, Religion and Churches

Drug Prevention Cyclists Race to Reach Youth with the Truth About Drugs

LOS ANGELES, Calif. -- After a two-year hiatus because of COVID, athletes are once more sprinting through the Czech Republic to reach youth with the truth about drugs. Founder Vlastimil Špalek and his team of drug-prevention activists are featured in an episode of "Voices for Humanity" on the Scientology Network.

Athletes on the grueling 10-day, 1,200-kilometers (745-mile) circuit through the Czech Republic view this sporting event as a race against time. The 18th annual Drug-Free Czech Cyclo-Run (pausing only when prevented by the pandemic) is a campaign to help protect youth from the tragedy of drug abuse and addiction. And the numbers tell the tale.

Roughly one in three Czech Republic children and teens have experimented with an illicit substance, says the group's spokesperson. This is an estimated 200,000 youths, including children as young as 10.

Cycling through a circuit of 41 towns and cities, the team will complete their tour of the country in 10 days.

A Cyclo-Run, a term they coined, cycles from town to town and leads youth and community leaders and officials through an anti-drug run in each of their destinations.

In each town, they also meet with officials and community leaders, provide youth with drug education lessons, and lead them in taking the association's drug-free pledge.

"As long as people think drugs are a matter of personal freedom and don't see the harm in them, they are willing to try them," says Vlastimil Špalek, Cyclo-Run founder and chairman of Drug-Free World Czech Republic. "And once they start using, they're soon addicted. It is not good enough just to tell young people not to get involved with drugs. You have to give them a way to get the facts themselves, come to their own conclusions, and make their own decisions about whether or not to get involved."

According to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, "Prevention strategies based on scientific evidence working with families, schools, and communities can ensure that children and youth, especially the most marginalized and poor, grow and stay healthy and safe into adulthood and old age. For every dollar spent on prevention, at least ten can be saved in future health, social and crime costs."

Noting the role substance abuse plays in the disintegration of the social fabric, Scientology Founder L. Ron Hubbard wrote, "Research has demonstrated that the single most destructive element present in our current culture is drugs."

Foundation for a Drug-Free World was formed in 2006 to serve as the primary distributor of educational materials and to develop new materials to meet the challenge of continually changing drug trends. The Foundation has grown to a network of some 200 chapters around the world. Thanks to the support of the Church of Scientology and Scientologists, it provides the Truth About Drugs secular program and materials free of charge to drug educators worldwide.

Voices for Humanity is a Scientology Network original series of short documentaries introducing changemakers from all faiths, cultures and nations as they extend help to their communities through Scientology-sponsored humanitarian programs.

Since launching with a special episode featuring Scientology ecclesiastical leader Mr. David Miscavige, Scientology Network has been viewed in 240 countries and territories worldwide in 17 languages. Broadcast from Scientology Media Productions, the Church's global media center in Los Angeles, the Scientology Network is available on DIRECTV Channel 320 and can be streamed at Scientology.tv, on mobile apps and via the Roku, Amazon Fire and Apple TV platforms.

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https://www.scientology.tv/series/voices-for-humanity/

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Free News Articles, Religion and Churches

5 Actions That Can Save Lives from Drug Overdose

LOS ANGELES, Calif. -- Scientology Churches provide tools anyone can use to help in the face of the drug overdose crisis. In honor of International Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking, learn and use these tools and help turn the tide on the drug overdose crisis.

There are five simple things anyone can do to take effective action against overdose deaths.

Parents, educators, community leaders and individuals - using these resources - can save lives.

Take these simple steps:

* Understand how drugs work and what they do by reading the Truth About Drugs booklets available through the website of Foundation for a Drug-Free World.

* Attend the Foundation's International Day Against Drugs Online Conference.

* Enroll on free online drug education courses on the Foundation's website. See how easy it is to learn the truth about drugs. Educate yourself and use this information to feel confident about speaking to others on this vital subject.

* Make the decision to use what you've learned to help your family, friends and community as a drug prevention volunteer.

* Order your drug prevention materials. They will be shipped to you free of charge.

According to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, "Prevention strategies based on scientific evidence working with families, schools, and communities can ensure that children and youth, especially the most marginalized and poor, grow and stay healthy and safe into adulthood and old age. For every dollar spent on prevention, at least ten can be saved in future health, social and crime costs."

Using the resources from Foundation for a Drug-Free World, volunteers in countries across the globe are reaching their communities with this vital information. See how effective this initiative is by watching episodes of Voices for Humanity on the Scientology Network.

Scientology Churches are marking International Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking with programs to bring these drug-prevention tools to their communities. They will also provide free training in the use of the Truth About Drugs materials and will assist you in any way they can to help you succeed in this vital endeavor. Contact your nearest Scientology Church for details.

Noting the role substance abuse plays in the disintegration of the social fabric, Scientology Founder L. Ron Hubbard wrote, "Research has demonstrated that the single most destructive element present in our current culture is drugs."

Foundation for a Drug-Free World was formed in 2006 to serve as the primary distributor of educational materials and to develop new materials to meet the challenge of continually changing drug trends. The Foundation has grown to a network of some 200 chapters around the world. Thanks to the support of the Church of Scientology and Scientologists, it provides the Truth About Drugs secular program and materials free of charge to drug educators worldwide.

LEARN MORE:

https://www.scientology.tv/series/voices-for-humanity/

https://www.scientologynews.org/press-releases/

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Free News Articles, Religion and Churches

Church of Scientology Celebrates African World Heritage Day by Honoring Changemakers

LOS ANGELES, Calif. -- The heritage of Africa depends on what we do now to ensure future generations flourish and prosper says the Church of Scientology. UNESCO set aside May 5 as African World Heritage Day to celebrate the continent's unique cultural and natural heritage and to "spearhead international efforts to draw on the vast potential of Africa's cultural and natural heritage as a force for poverty reduction and social cohesion."

The Church of Scientology sponsors humanitarian programs that address crucial factors preventing the realization of these goals: drug abuse, violation of human rights, illiteracy, and systemic corruption.

In sub-Saharan Africa, 88 percent of children of primary and lower secondary school age (202 million) were reported as not proficient in reading, and 84 percent (193 million) were not proficient in mathematics in 2015, according to the United Nations Statistics Division.

Substance abuse, particularly alcohol consumption, has been on the rise in Africa for years, according to the World Health Organization.

The UN Office on Drugs and Crime reports that of 4,799 trafficking victims detected in 26 sub-Saharan African countries from 2016 to 2019, 3,336 were in West Africa including 2,553 children, and 80 percent of victims were trafficked for forced labor.

And according to Commonwealth Secretary-General Patricia Scotland QC, sub-Saharan Africa received nearly $2 trillion in Foreign Direct Investment and official development assistance between 1980 and 2018, but lost more than $1 trillion to illicit financial outflows. "When looking at the whole of Africa, that figure rises to $1.3 trillion," she told anticorruption representatives gathered in Kigali, Rwanda, for a conference May 3-6. "And let us be clear, $1.3 trillion could lift the 1.4 billion people living on less than $1.25 per day out of poverty."

Seen in the light of some 40 percent of the population in Africa being 15 years old and younger, effective programs that provide youth with the tools they need to address these crises are key to the future of this continent.

Voices for Humanity, an original series on the Scientology Network, features changemakers who are tackling these issues in Africa, helping youth of their countries rise up and achieve their full potential:

* Barry Paul fights against the culture of drugs and violence in his native Kenya. He leads a movement to educate youth on the dangers of drugs, inspiring them to choose a better path.

* Nfamara Jawneh spread the message of human rights in The Gambia after a brutal dictatorship massacred students protesting the regime. His campaign is credited with helping to usher in a new era of democracy in the country.

* Dr. Olatunde Odewumi witnessed the devastating impact of illiteracy in his native Nigeria. He confronted the issue by introducing a new method of education developed by L. Ron Hubbard and has since helped educate hundreds of thousands across the country.

* Zambian priest Teddy Sichinga has introduced poverty-stricken communities to "The Way to Happiness," a common-sense guide to better living. The results have been truly remarkable.

Each of these humanitarian initiatives is sponsored by the Church of Scientology and Scientologists. Thanks to their support, all written and audiovisual materials and educator resources are provided free of charge to educators, parents, community and religious leaders and anyone wishing to take effective action to ensure the full potential of their communities.

These and many more episodes of Voices for Humanity are available through the Scientology Network on DIRECTV Channel 320 and streaming at Scientology.tv, on mobile apps and via the Roku, Amazon Fire and Apple TV platforms.

Since launching with a special episode featuring Scientology ecclesiastical leader Mr. David Miscavige, Scientology Network has been viewed in 240 countries and territories worldwide in 17 languages.

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https://www.scientology.tv/series/voices-for-humanity/

https://www.scientologynews.org/press-releases/

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If the Slave Trade Was Abolished, Why Do an Estimated 40 Million Still Live in Slavery?

LOS ANGELES, Calif. -- March 25 was International Day of Remembrance of the Victims of Slavery and the Transatlantic Slave Trade. Churches of Scientology mark this day by raising awareness of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. And with good reason.

An estimated 13 million people were captured and sold as slaves during the transatlantic slave trade between the 15th and 19th centuries. But the United Nations estimates some 40 million live in slavery today.

According to Dr. Katarina Schwarz, associate director of the Rights Lab's Law and Policy Programme at the University of Nottingham, England, 94 of the 193 UN member states appear not to have made slavery a crime. Schwartz published an article co-written by Jean Allain, professor of international law at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia; and Andrea Nicholson, Nottingham Research Fellow at the University of Nottingham; on the state of human trafficking, based on research compiled by the Antislavery in Domestic Legislation Database.

They found that although 96 percent of all UN Member Nations have some form of domestic anti-trafficking legislation:

* 94 states do not have legislation prohibiting slavery.

* 112 states do not have penal provisions punishing forced labor.

* 170 have not criminalized institutions and practices similar to slavery.

* 180 have not enacted legislation criminalizing servitude.

* In all these countries, there is no criminal law to punish those subjecting others to extreme forms of human exploitation.

In 1969, Scientology Founder L. Ron Hubbard observed: "Very few governments have implemented any part of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. These governments have not grasped that their very survival depends utterly upon adopting such reforms and thus giving their peoples a cause, a civilization worth supporting, worth their patriotism."

Universal Declaration of Human Rights article 4 states, "No one shall be held in slavery or servitude; slavery and the slave trade shall be prohibited in all their forms."

But as Mr. Hubbard also pointed out, "Human rights must be made a fact, not an idealistic dream," a statement borne out by these Antislavery in Domestic Legislation Database statistics.

Scientologists believe that raising awareness of human rights is the ultimate answer to this and other forms of abuse. They take part in educational initiatives to increase understanding of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. They work to mandate human rights education in their nations' schools. And they urge their governments to enact legislation to ensure the articles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights have the force of law.

The Scientology Network features the work of human rights activists who have adopted these programs to end human trafficking and other abuse. Their work, and the inroads they have made, is demonstrated in episodes of the original TV series Voices for Humanity.

THESE INCLUDE:

* Mary Shuttleworth, who witnessed rampant human rights abuses growing up in apartheid South Africa. Committed to ending human trafficking and other violations of human rights, she founded Youth for Human Rights International to teach young people around the world the importance of human rights.

* Cynthia Guerra, who grew up in Guatemala during a civil war that was notorious for rampant human rights violations carried out by its military. An estimated 20 percent of Guatemalan children, some as young as seven, are subject to forced labor. To counter this and other human rights abuses, Guerra leads a nationwide program to educate civilians, police, and the military on human rights.

* Braulio Vargas, whose episode exposes a hidden side of Costa Rica with an eye-opening account of the problems plaguing many of its citizens - from human trafficking to homelessness. His work in promoting human rights is raising awareness across the nation.

* Raúl Arias, who came face to face with human rights violations when he and a friend were nearly abducted by kidnappers. Later, heartbroken by the stories of those who lost family members to human trafficking, he confronted the issue head-on by becoming executive director of Youth for Human Rights Mexico.

The Church of Scientology and its members sponsor one of the world's broadest human rights education and public information initiatives, United for Human Rights, and its program for young people, Youth for Human Rights. Through this support, they ensure these educational materials are available free of charge to all.

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https://www.scientology.org/how-we-help/human-rights/

https://www.scientology.tv/series/voices-for-humanity/

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Free News Articles, Religion and Churches

This Sunday, Join the Scientology Network for International Day of Happiness

LOS ANGELES, Calif. -- The United Nations created International Day of Happiness, March 20, because happiness is a fundamental human goal. But is there something that can help transform the desire for happiness into its accomplishment?

On International Day of Happiness, the Scientology Network invites anyone wishing to attain or increase their happiness or the happiness of others to take advantage of an all-day broadcasting marathon. The Network will feature "The Way to Happiness," the common-sense guide to better living by humanitarian and Scientology Founder L. Ron Hubbard. And it will spotlight the social betterment campaign the book inspires and its positive impact across the globe.

"The Way to Happiness" is built upon universally held beliefs and laws of morality, integrity and trust. It resonates with people of all faiths and none. And millions across 156 countries use the book to guide and improve their lives.

The network's International Happiness Day marathon includes "The Way to Happiness" book-on-film and episodes of the original series, Voices for Humanity, showcasing the movement in action. Episodes document how the booklet helped:

* Broker peace among warring gangs in South Central Los Angeles

* Reduce crime in inner-city Denver neighborhoods

* Transform a poverty-stricken village in Zambia into one on its way to sustainability

* Awaken hardened Colombian soldiers-once notorious for their extrajudicial killing of innocent civilians-to their responsibility for preserving the lives and welfare of their fellow citizens.

The full International Happiness Day schedule is available at www.Scientology.tv/schedule.

The Scientology Network debuted in 2018. Since launching with a special episode featuring Scientology ecclesiastical leader Mr. David Miscavige, Scientology Network has been viewed in 240 countries and territories worldwide in 17 languages.

Satisfying curiosity about Scientology, the network takes viewers across six continents, spotlighting the everyday lives of Scientologists, showing the Church as a global organization, and presenting its social betterment programs that have touched the lives of millions worldwide. The network also showcases documentaries by independent filmmakers who represent a cross-section of cultures and faiths, but share a common purpose of uplifting communities.

Broadcast from Scientology Media Productions, the Church's global media center in Los Angeles, the Scientology Network can be streamed at Scientology.tv and is available through satellite television, mobile apps and via the Roku, Amazon Fire and Apple TV platforms.

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https://www.scientology.tv/documentaries/common-sense-for-life.html

https://www.scientology.tv/series/voices-for-humanity/episodes/

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Free News Articles, Religion and Churches

Scientology Network Reveals Psychiatry’s Abuse of the African-American Community

LOS ANGELES, Calif. -- An episode of "Voices for Humanity" on the Scientology Network documents the work of Rev. Fred Shaw, international spokesperson for Citizens Commission on Human Rights (CCHR) and vice president of the Inglewood/South Bay chapter of NAACP.

"David can beat Goliath," says Rev. Shaw. "As long as I can breathe, as long as I can stand, I want to help my fellow man by arming them with the truth."

One of Shaw's heroes growing up was Martin Luther King Jr. He not only inspired Shaw to become a minister but also to dedicate his life to service to the community.

In the belief that many problems between the African American community and law enforcement could be resolved if there were more Black officers, he became an L.A. County Sheriff's deputy, where he worked with the Sherriff's Athletic League and in community relations.

But it was his work in crime prevention that opened his eyes to root causes of the problems in his community - what he describes as "systemic abuse and institutional racism that pervades the psychiatric-behavioral industry."

Shaw, who recently founded the CCHR Task Force Against Institutional Racism in the Psychiatric Industry, is dedicated to exposing and combating the abuse of people of color and minorities in the field of mental health.

"My passion is to elevate people, especially in the African-American community, and to help them know the traps that are out there," says Shaw. "There's an old saying that if you saw a trap coming, it wouldn't be a trap."

Citizens Commission on Human Rights is a nonprofit charitable mental health watchdog established by the Church of Scientology in 1969, dedicated to eradicating psychiatric abuses and ensuring patient protections.

Scientology Network has been viewed in 240 countries and territories worldwide in 17 languages. Broadcast from Scientology Media Productions, the Church's global media center in Los Angeles, the Scientology Network is available on DIRECTV Channel 320 and can be streamed on Scientology.tv, mobile apps and via the Roku, Amazon Fire and Apple TV platforms.

LEARN MORE:

https://www.scientology.tv/series/voices-for-humanity/fred-shaw.html

https://www.cchrint.org/2020/06/23/task-force-launched-to-combat-institutional-racism-in-psychiatric-industry/

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How One Man is Helping Youth Avoid the Tragedy of Human Trafficking

TAMPA, Fla. -- January is Human Trafficking Prevention Month and the Scientology Network invites viewers to watch an episode of "Voices for Humanity" featuring a Tampa Bay Area entrepreneur who is dedicated to saving kids from modern-day slavery.

The U.S. Department of Justice estimates that 200,000 American children are at risk of being trafficked into the sex industry each year,

Christopher King, fashion designer, U.S Marine veteran and grandson of blues legend BB King, founded the nonprofit The Gentlemen's Course to save kids from human trafficking and any form of human rights abuse and to provide them with the moral compass and social skills they need to thrive.

Florida is the third-busiest hub for child sex trafficking in the United States.

"We're talking about kids being sold, traded, forced against their own will," says King in his episode of "Voices for Humanity." "No one should be a slave, and no one has the right to enslave anyone."

King learned of Youth for Human Rights International on a visit to the United for Human Rights headquarters in Clearwater, Florida. "That gave me a guide on how to educate youth. At that point, I founded The Gentlemen's Course."

King and his team bring his programs right to the kids.

"Human traffickers, they're in the schools. They're on social media. They're getting the kids on their platforms," says King. "So we might as well attack them on the same ground. If people knew their rights, they would know what to defend. That is the purpose. That's our goal."

Youth for Human Rights International materials help people of all ages understand the 30 rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Creating a world where human rights are known and protected starts with effective educational programs that reach across all cultural and geographic boundaries.

Inspired by Scientology Founder L. Ron Hubbard's words that "Human rights must be made a fact, not an idealistic dream," the Church of Scientology and Scientologists support Youth for Human Rights and make its educational materials available free of charge. Watch a documentary on the history and activities of Youth for Human Rights International on "Voices for Humanity" on the Scientology Network.

Since launching with a special episode featuring Scientology ecclesiastical leader Mr. David Miscavige, Scientology Network has been viewed in 240 countries and territories worldwide in 17 languages. Broadcast from Scientology Media Productions, the Church's global media center in Los Angeles, the Scientology Network is available on DIRECTV Channel 320 and can be streamed on Scientology.tv, mobile apps and via the Roku, Amazon Fire and Apple TV platforms.

RELATED LINKS:

https://www.scientology.tv/series/voices-for-humanity/christopher-king.html

https://www.ncjrs.gov/ovc_archives/ncvrw/2005/pg5l.html#:~:text=Each%20year%2C%20an%20estimated%2014%2C500,(U.S.%20Department%20of%20Justice

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Education and Schools, Free News Articles, Religion and Churches

For International Day of Education, Scientology Network Shares Help to Overcome Learning Disabilities

MIAMI, Fla. -- Each year, the United Nations sets aside January 24 as International Day of Education. Among this year's goals: "unlocking the potential in every person." The episode "Help for Miami," of the "Voices for Humanity" series on the Scientology Network takes viewers inside an innovative program that is shattering the glass ceiling for those labeled with learning disabilities.

"Our country is in crisis today," says Tamara Batalha, cofounder and administrator of HELP Miami.

"Kids are being labeled and drugged. They're not learning," adds HELP Miami's principal Barbie Rivera. "This is a tragedy."

Together, they are introducing kids to a new way of learning.

"Families thought the only solution was to drug their child and now they don't have to anymore," says Batalha. "The beauty of our program is we treat every child as an individual, so no matter where they are on their educational level, we're able to work with them."

HELP Miami is a dynamic program using Study Technology developed by author, humanitarian and Scientology Founder L. Ron Hubbard. It provides a fully workable approach to teaching students how to learn.

One mother relates that her son was getting "F" in subject after subject at the school where he attended 5th grade. They were advised to place him on medication, but that caused side effects. "He told me he hated school. He wanted to drop out." When they enrolled him at HELP Miami, everything changed. "They brought him up to grade level," the mother said. "Now he's in 8th grade and every single year, he's gotten honor roll. Being able to learn how to learn, this is an incredible gift that HELP Miami is giving these kids."

Go behind the scenes of this innovative school that is providing a bright future for kids who were told they would never have one.

Scientology Network's "Voices for Humanity," is a weekly series presenting heroic changemakers from a variety of faiths, cultures and nations, working to uplift their communities.

Since launching with a special episode featuring Scientology ecclesiastical leader Mr. David Miscavige, Scientology Network has been viewed in 240 countries and territories worldwide in 17 languages.

Broadcast from Scientology Media Productions, the Church's global media center in Los Angeles, the Scientology Network is available on DIRECTV Channel 320 and can be streamed at Scientology.tv, on mobile apps and via the Roku, Amazon Fire and Apple TV platforms.

Related link: https://www.scientology.org/

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Scientology Network: How One Man Helps Imbue His Country with a Culture of Human Rights

LOS ANGELES, Calif. -- In an episode of "Voices for Humanity" on the Scientology Network, Braulio Vargas exposes a hidden side of Costa Rica with an eye-opening account of the problems plaguing many of its citizens - from human trafficking to homelessness. His work is raising awareness of human rights and creating change across the nation.

"Costa Rica inspired the peace agreements that ended the Cold War in Central America, bringing stability to our region," says Vargas, Executive Director of Youth for Human Rights Costa Rica. It is a beautiful country-a veritable paradise. But 22 percent of the population lives in poverty and human trafficking victims as young as 5 are sold into slavery in the sex trade. "This is the real Costa Rica," he says, "but there's hope. Human Rights is the answer. And my goal is to bring tolerance and peace through education."

Vargas put himself through school to become a lawyer so he could help restore rights to those for whom they had been denied. But progress was slow. And when he learned of Youth for Human Rights International, he realized this program contained the necessary component for raising the quality of life across his nation. Youth for Human Rights International educates people on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. And uninformed people who don't know their rights are easily abused.

Youth for Human Rights International materials help people of all ages understand the 30 rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Creating a world where human rights are known and protected starts with effective educational programs that reach across all cultural and geographic boundaries.

Beginning his work with Youth for Human Rights in 2014, Vargas embarked on a campaign to educate the entire nation on human rights-from farmhands to kids, whether attending school or living on the streets.

His drive to infuse human rights into Costa Rican culture scored when the national soccer federation joined his team, promoting human rights on a massive scale.

Vargas' work has resulted in an important milestone. With the help of Youth for Human Rights International and the support of the Church of Scientology Mission of Costa Rica, in August 2021, the Legislative Assembly of Costa Rica passed into law a bill mandating human rights education in schools throughout the country.

Inspired by Scientology Founder L. Ron Hubbard's words that "Human rights must be made a fact, not an idealistic dream," the Church of Scientology and Scientologists support Youth for Human Rights and make its educational materials available free of charge. For more information, watch a documentary on the history and activities of Youth for Human Rights International on "Voices for Humanity" on the Scientology Network.

Since launching with a special episode featuring Scientology ecclesiastical leader Mr. David Miscavige, Scientology Network has been viewed in 240 countries and territories worldwide in 17 languages. Broadcast from Scientology Media Productions, the Church's global media center in Los Angeles, the Scientology Network is available on DIRECTV Channel 320 and can be streamed at Scientology.tv, on mobile apps and via the Roku, Amazon Fire and Apple TV platforms.

LEARN MORE: https://www.scientology.tv/series/voices-for-humanity/

Related link: https://www.scientology.org/

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Free News Articles, Global Aid and Disaster Relief, Religion and Churches

Celebrate Human Rights Day as The Scientology Network Features Human Rights Heroes

LOS ANGELES, Calif. -- In celebration of Human Rights Day 2021, the Church of Scientology International shares the story of brother and sister team Sandra and Felipe Poveda who inspired a culture of human rights in one of the most violent regions on Earth. Their story unfolds on "Voices for Humanity," featured on the Scientology Network.

More than five decades of guerilla warfare left its mark on every level of Colombian society with some 220,000 dead and atrocities reported on both sides.

It was 2009 when a scandal broke implicating the Colombian military with generating what was euphemistically called "false positives." This was the practice of executing civilians, dressing them as guerillas, reporting them as casualties and collecting a bounty.

Sandra Poveda, founder of Youth for Human Rights Colombia, and her brother Felipe, the group's president, approached the Minister of Defense who was trying to deal with this by creating a human rights school for the army. After the Povedas ran a pilot using the Youth for Human Rights educational materials and seeing their impact on the troops, he decided to implement the campaign across the country.

The Povedas enlisted the help of entertainment and sports celebrities, organized concerts, gave TV interviews and arranged for the Youth for Human Rights public service announcements to air on hundreds of stations throughout the country.

They traveled to war zones where they educated troops on the basics of human rights, all based on the 30 articles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights whose 73rd anniversary is celebrated December 10. Through practical examples of the application of these materials, they got through to soldiers that article 3, the Right to Life, applies to everyone-even to the lives of guerrillas.

The result was unprecedented. In a letter to the Foundation, the director of the Colombian military's human rights school in Bogotá stated that the Foundation's campaigns had contributed to a 96-percent decrease in civilian reports of armed forces' human rights violations.

Their story is documented in an episode of "Voices for Humanity" on the Scientology Network.

In 1948 the United Nations called upon all member countries to publicize the text of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and "to cause it to be disseminated, displayed, read and expounded principally in schools and other educational institutions, without distinction based on the political status of countries or territories." Youth for Human Rights International materials help people of all ages understand the 30 rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Creating a world where human rights are known and protected starts with effective educational programs that reach across all cultural and geographic boundaries.

Inspired by Scientology Founder L. Ron Hubbard's words that "Human rights must be made a fact, not an idealistic dream," the Church of Scientology and Scientologists support Youth for Human Rights and make its educational materials available free of charge. Watch a documentary on the history and activities of Youth for Human Rights International on "Voices for Humanity" on the Scientology Network.

Since launching with a special episode featuring Scientology ecclesiastical leader Mr. David Miscavige, Scientology Network has been viewed in 240 countries and territories worldwide in 17 languages. Broadcast from Scientology Media Productions, the Church's global media center in Los Angeles, the Scientology Network is available on DIRECTV Channel 320 and can be streamed at Scientology.tv, on mobile apps and via the Roku, Amazon Fire and Apple TV platforms.

Related link: https://www.scientology.org/

This news story was published by the Neotrope® News Network - all rights reserved.