Construction and Building, Free News Articles, General Editorial, Home and Garden, NonProfit and Charities, Real Estate

Taking it Down to Earth: Debunking Myths about Lightning Protection

CUMBERLAND, Maine -- Old and new myths about lightning protection continue to circulate through the internet and unsafe lightning protection products still manage to find their way into construction job specifications in many parts of the U.S. To help safeguard properties from a leading weather threat, the National Lightning Safety Council (NLSC) is stressing the importance of separating fact from fallacy about lightning protection systems (LPS).

"Despite the wealth of accurate information on lightning, lightning safety and lightning protection, there are still many myths and misunderstandings that persist," said John Jensenius, a lightning safety specialist with the NLSC.

Just in time for Lightning Safety Awareness Week, the NLSC debunks five common myths about lightning protection:

1 - Lightning rods attract lightning

Unfortunately, this is a common misconception about lightning protection. Lightning protection systems and strike termination devices (industry name for lightning rods which are part of the system) work in conjunction with a grounding network to intercept a lightning strike and provide a safe and effective path that dissipates lightning's harmful electricity into the earth.

2 - Tall trees protect a structure against lightning

False. Lightning can side-flash from a tree and hit a nearby structure. Additionally, when lightning strikes and travels underground along tree roots, it can enter a structure by jumping onto nearby telephone, cable and electrical lines, introducing harmful surges. Lightning can also injure a tree from a direct strike, causing limbs to split and fall onto a nearby structure.

3 - Homes and building are already grounded and don't need lightning protection

The electrical ground installed by an electrician is there to protect the internal workings of the electrical system in a building to accommodate everyday electricity usage-it's not designed to handle the mega electricity (100 million + volts of power or 200 kA of electrical energy!) that a lightning strike can pack.

4 - A lightning rod is easy to install

Lightning protection is a complex system (not just a "rod") of UL-listed materials and methods which comply with nationally-recognized safety standards of the Lightning Protection Institute (LPI), the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and Underwriters Laboratories (UL). LPS is not a do-it-yourself project. Only trained experts like LPI-certified lightning protection contractors should install lightning protection systems, since design and installation is rarely within the scope of expertise held by homeowners, general contractors or roofers.

5 - Surge protection and "whole house" arresters protect structures from lightning

False. Surge protection is only one element of a complete lightning protection system. A grounding network for lightning (lightning protection system) must be implemented to provide structural protection. A LPS that meets national safety standards includes strike termination devices, down conductors, bonding, grounding and UL-rated surge protection devices.

"Lightning just wants to get to ground and a safety standard compliant lightning protection system helps it get there without harmful impact to the structure, contents or building systems," said Kimberly Loehr, a lightning protection specialist and member of the NLSC. "The concept is simple, but the safety standards are complex and detail principles including zone of protection, common bonding of grounded systems, potential equalization of ground impedance, lightning risk assessment and much more," explained Loehr.

People looking to learn more about lightning safety, risk reduction and the annual Lightning Safety Awareness Week campaign, June 19-25, 2022, can visit http://www.lightningsafetycouncil.org/.

MULTIMEDIA:

PHOTO link for media: https://www.Send2Press.com/300dpi/22-0617-s2p-lps-grounding-300dpi.jpg

Photo Caption: A safety standard compliant lightning protection system (LPS) functions as a grounding network to intercept a lightning strike and provide an effective path for dissipating lightning's destructive electricity into the earth without harmful impact to a structure, its contents or building systems.

RELATED LINKS:

http://www.lightningsafetycouncil.org/LSC-LSAW.html

https://lightning.org/about/find-a-contractor/

Related link: http://lightningsafetycouncil.org/

This news story was published by the Neotrope® News Network - all rights reserved. ID:NEO2022

Construction and Building, Free News Articles, General Editorial, Home and Garden, NonProfit and Charities, Real Estate

Taking it Down to Earth: Debunking Myths about Lightning Protection

CUMBERLAND, Maine -- Old and new myths about lightning protection continue to circulate through the internet and unsafe lightning protection products still manage to find their way into construction job specifications in many parts of the U.S. To help safeguard properties from a leading weather threat, the National Lightning Safety Council (NLSC) is stressing the importance of separating fact from fallacy about lightning protection systems (LPS).

"Despite the wealth of accurate information on lightning, lightning safety and lightning protection, there are still many myths and misunderstandings that persist," said John Jensenius, a lightning safety specialist with the NLSC.

Just in time for Lightning Safety Awareness Week, the NLSC debunks five common myths about lightning protection:

1 - Lightning rods attract lightning

Unfortunately, this is a common misconception about lightning protection. Lightning protection systems and strike termination devices (industry name for lightning rods which are part of the system) work in conjunction with a grounding network to intercept a lightning strike and provide a safe and effective path that dissipates lightning's harmful electricity into the earth.

2 - Tall trees protect a structure against lightning

False. Lightning can side-flash from a tree and hit a nearby structure. Additionally, when lightning strikes and travels underground along tree roots, it can enter a structure by jumping onto nearby telephone, cable and electrical lines, introducing harmful surges. Lightning can also injure a tree from a direct strike, causing limbs to split and fall onto a nearby structure.

3 - Homes and building are already grounded and don't need lightning protection

The electrical ground installed by an electrician is there to protect the internal workings of the electrical system in a building to accommodate everyday electricity usage-it's not designed to handle the mega electricity (100 million + volts of power or 200 kA of electrical energy!) that a lightning strike can pack.

4 - A lightning rod is easy to install

Lightning protection is a complex system (not just a "rod") of UL-listed materials and methods which comply with nationally-recognized safety standards of the Lightning Protection Institute (LPI), the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and Underwriters Laboratories (UL). LPS is not a do-it-yourself project. Only trained experts like LPI-certified lightning protection contractors should install lightning protection systems, since design and installation is rarely within the scope of expertise held by homeowners, general contractors or roofers.

5 - Surge protection and "whole house" arresters protect structures from lightning

False. Surge protection is only one element of a complete lightning protection system. A grounding network for lightning (lightning protection system) must be implemented to provide structural protection. A LPS that meets national safety standards includes strike termination devices, down conductors, bonding, grounding and UL-rated surge protection devices.

"Lightning just wants to get to ground and a safety standard compliant lightning protection system helps it get there without harmful impact to the structure, contents or building systems," said Kimberly Loehr, a lightning protection specialist and member of the NLSC. "The concept is simple, but the safety standards are complex and detail principles including zone of protection, common bonding of grounded systems, potential equalization of ground impedance, lightning risk assessment and much more," explained Loehr.

People looking to learn more about lightning safety, risk reduction and the annual Lightning Safety Awareness Week campaign, June 19-25, 2022, can visit http://www.lightningsafetycouncil.org/.

MULTIMEDIA:

PHOTO link for media: https://www.Send2Press.com/300dpi/22-0617-s2p-lps-grounding-300dpi.jpg

Photo Caption: A safety standard compliant lightning protection system (LPS) functions as a grounding network to intercept a lightning strike and provide an effective path for dissipating lightning's destructive electricity into the earth without harmful impact to a structure, its contents or building systems.

RELATED LINKS:

http://www.lightningsafetycouncil.org/LSC-LSAW.html

https://lightning.org/about/find-a-contractor/

Related link: http://lightningsafetycouncil.org/

This news story was published by the Neotrope® News Network - all rights reserved. ID:NEO2022

Free News Articles, General Editorial, NonProfit and Charities

Super Bowl Commercial Highlights Lightning’s Danger and Lasting Impact on Survivors

CUMBERLAND, Maine -- A commercial expected to air during Sunday's Super Bowl has caught the attention of the National Lightning Safety Council (NLSC). The ad will feature a lightning strike survivor's apparent phobia of electricity which developed after being injured while riding a motorcycle. While the humorous commercial was created for other purposes, it also provides an opportunity for the NLSC to dispel a common lightning myth and to highlight the potential long-term health effects for lightning strike survivors.

According to news reports, Seth Thomas (the victim depicted in the Super Bowl ad) and his father were injured by lightning while on a motorcycle trip in 2012.

"Many people still believe the myth that rubber tires protect you from lightning, but they do not," said John Jensenius, a lightning safety specialist with the NLSC. "It's very dangerous to be riding a motorcycle or to be involved in any other outdoor activity during a thunderstorm."

Data collected by the NLSC, cites 12 people in the U.S. as being struck and killed by lightning while motorcycling from 2006 to 2021.

According to Mary Ann Cooper, MD, international lightning safety expert and medical specialist with the NLSC, long term health effects are common with lightning-strike survivors.

"Many survivors suffer brain injury, post-traumatic stress disorder, and chronic pain syndromes from the nerve injuries that lightning commonly causes," said Dr. Cooper. "The fear of electricity that this Super Bowl advertisement humorously portrays is not uncommon with lightning and electrical injury survivors," she explained.

The NLSC hopes the Super Bowl prime airing of the commercial will prompt conversations and spark awareness about the dangers of lightning to prevent more deaths and injuries.

"Not all lightning survivors will find this commercial funny, but sometimes humor gets the word out to certain audiences better than serious warnings," added Dr. Cooper.

The NLSC urges lightning strike survivors and families coping with the often misunderstood medical effects of these injuries to contact the Lightning Strike & Electric Shock Survivors International, a non-profit support group founded in 1989.

The National Lightning Safety Council invites educators, government officials and others to help build lightning safe communities by learning more about lightning safety, lightning protection and risk reduction.

Visit the http://www.lightningsafetycouncil.org/ for shareable information, resources and safety tips.

Inquiries about specific lightning concerns can also be addressed to Council members via contacts here: http://www.lightningsafetycouncil.com/LSC-About.html.

RELATED LINKS:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZzcdP90akWM

http://lightningsafetycouncil.org/Activities/Motorcycles.pdf

https://www.lightning-strike.org/

Related link: http://lightningsafetycouncil.org/

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Business, Free News Articles, General Editorial

U.S. Sees Record Low Number of Lightning Deaths in 2021 – Lightning Safety Awareness Effort Reaches Milestone

CUMBERLAND, Maine -- According to the National Lightning Safety Council, the lightning death toll of 11 in 2021 set a new record for the fewest documented U.S. lightning deaths in a year. The previous low recorded by NOAA was 16 deaths in 2017.

"This new low of 11 lightning deaths is dramatically fewer than the 432 Americans killed by lightning in 1943," said John Jensenius, a lightning safety specialist with the National Lightning Safety Council (NLSC).

During 2021, leisure activities contributed to eight of the 11 lightning fatalities with work-related activities causing the remaining three. Five of the fatalities were on beaches with three on golf courses. Listings of lightning fatalities since 2006 can be found on the National Lightning Safety Council website (http://lightningsafetycouncil.org/LSC-LightningFatalities.html).

"With more than 194 million lightning events detected across the United States and 2.4 billion detected around the world in 2021, lightning safety should be a consideration during any outdoor activity," said Chris Vagasky, a lightning data specialist with the National Lightning Safety Council.

Jensenius attributes the recent drop in lightning fatalities to increased awareness efforts, including lightning safety campaigns, and the growing accessibility of weather information.

"When the Lightning Safety Awareness Campaign began in 2001, the U.S. averaged 47 lightning fatalities a year," Jensenius explained. "The average number of deaths for the past five years has now dropped to 17. It's very rewarding to know that the campaign has been so successful."

The record low in lightning deaths is an important milestone in the lightning safety awareness effort in light of a significant increase in U.S. and global lightning activity, as documented by Vaisala in its 2021 Annual Lightning Report. Amidst a constantly changing lightning landscape, the NLSC emphasizes the importance of continued vigilance against the capricious weather threat.

"Continued efforts to increase lightning safety awareness will help keep people safe in the United States and globally," said Vagasky.

The National Lightning Safety Council invites educators, government officials and others to help build lightning safe communities by learning more about lightning safety, lightning protection and risk reduction.

Visit the http://www.lightningsafetycouncil.org/ for shareable information, resources and safety tips.

Inquiries about specific lightning concerns can also be addressed to Council members via contacts here: http://www.lightningsafetycouncil.com/LSC-About.html.

RELATED LINKS:

http://lightningsafetycouncil.org/LSC-LightningFatalities.html

https://www.vaisala.com/en/annual-lightning-report

Related link: http://lightningsafetycouncil.org/

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Free News Articles, General Editorial, Home and Garden, Sports and Activities

Lightning, Tragedy and Lessons Learned about Safety and Awareness: A Look Back at One of Lightning’s Deadliest Strikes

CUMBERLAND, Maine -- This Sunday marks the 70th anniversary of one of the deadliest lightning strikes in the U.S. and the National Lightning Safety Council is recalling the tragic event to spotlight the dangers of lightning, a common, yet underrated weather peril.

Lives were shattered in an instant on August 1, 1951 when lightning struck a tree at Wind Cave, Wyoming, killing four girl hikers and their leader and injuring nine others. The hikers were on a trek from a girls' camp in Darby Canyon to Wind Cave, Ice Cave, and back.

"Fortunately, most people are more aware of lightning's dangers now than they were in 1951," said John Jensenius, a lightning safety specialist with the National Lightning Safety Council (NLSC).

According to Jensenius, the Center for Disease Control logged 248 U.S. lightning deaths in 1951, which is one more than the combined total of 247 deaths the NLSC has documented for the past 10 years.

Karma Lambert, one of the most seriously injured survivors, vividly remembers events up until the time when lightning struck the tall tree that she and several others were sitting under. Lambert, now 84, attributes her survival to the quick actions of hiking guide, Fred Miller, and several older girls who repeatedly administered "artificial respiration."

Lambert's detailed account of the incident and her 2015 return to the site is featured on her daughter's website: https://watercolor365.com/my-mother-a-lightning-survivor-honors-victims/.

Now, 70 years after the event, Kelly Loosli, a professor of Animation and Film at Brigham Young University is interviewing survivors of the Wind Cave lightning incident for a documentary he's preparing. Loosli is the grandson of the then Teton County Sheriff Dwight Loosli, who organized men and horses to rescue the injured and transport the dead in the ensuing hours after the lightning strike.

"My interest stems from my grandfather's involvement in the rescue and the heroism of all those involved," said Loosli. "This was a terrible tragedy and I don't want to see anything like this ever happen again."

Lambert has advice for anyone headed out on a hike, "Check the forecast and if thunderstorms are predicted, just don't go."

Jensenius wants people to know what happened that tragic day in 1951 to stress the importance of monitoring weather conditions to limit the lightning threat.

"Consider canceling or postponing activities if thunderstorms are predicted and remember, when thunder roars, go indoors," advises Jensenius. "Lightning safety is a minor inconvenience that just might save your life."

The National Lightning Safety Council invites educators, government officials and others to help build lightning safe communities by learning more about lightning safety, lightning protection and risk reduction.

Visit the http://www.lightningsafetycouncil.org/ for shareable information, resources and safety tips. Inquiries about specific lightning concerns can also be addressed to Council members via contacts here: http://www.lightningsafetycouncil.com/LSC-About.html

MEDIA CONTACT:

Kimberly Loehr - Kimberly Loehr Consulting, kim@loehrlightning.com

RELATED LINKS:

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/vsus/VSUS_1951_2.pdf

https://designdept.byu.edu/directory/kelly-loosli

#lightning #lightningsafety #lightningsafecommunities @lightningkim

Related link: http://lightningsafetycouncil.org/

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Business, Free News Articles, Manufacturing, Product Launches, Travel and Tourism

Zootility Introduces Hover Shield For Travel, Designed To Fit Disposable Masks

PORTLAND, Maine -- Zootility, a design-driven US manufacturing company, announces a breakthrough innovation - the first travel eye shield, known as Hover Shield, that attaches to any disposable mask. Unlike any of its conventional bulky design predecessors, the nearly invisible Hover Shield provides an attractive solution for traveling, seasonal allergies, yard work, large public gatherings, institutional settings, and working in dusty environments.

Zootility's patent-pending loop hooking design allows the Hover Shield to be easily attached to any disposable mask with ear loops without applying any pressure to the face. The low-cost disposable shield was developed in part with support from the Maine Technology Institute (MTI).

The lightweight and transparent construction of the Hover Shield makes it barely noticeable. The Hover Shield seamlessly extends above any mask to cover the rest of the face. Other key features include universal attachment, adjustable angle, no straps and no pressure points design. Hover Shield also solves one of the biggest complaints wearers have with traditional face shields - fogging from their own warm exhalations. Hover Shield is available with an anti-fogging coating option.

"No one wants to wear a bulky eye shield when traveling. Hover Shield was created by travelers for travelers with comfort in mind and is perfect for air travel. Hover Shield deflects droplets from traveling directly into the eyes without obscuring the vision or adding the bulk that comes with conventional face shields. It basically just hovers there!" says Nate Barr, Founder of Zootility.

The product launch comes as more people worldwide are beginning to travel for the first time in a year amidst COVID numbers slowly increasing due to the highly virulent Delta variant. The CDC has long recommended eye protection in addition to a face mask whenever masking is required. Until now, there has not been a cost-effective solution for eye protection. The Hover Shield makes that recommendation easier to follow.

Visit Zootility's Kickstarter page to order your Hover Shield, meet the creators, and learn more about the product that is changing the way we travel: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/zootility-health/hover-shield.

Zootility designs, launches, and manufactures exciting functional everyday products that solve interesting problems using clever solutions, quality materials, and futuristic technology. For more information on Zootility, please visit http://www.zootility.com/.

MULTIMEDIA:

*PHOTO LINK for media: https://www.Send2Press.com/300dpi/21-0715s2p-zootility-300dpi.jpg

Caption: Zootility's travel eye shield, known as Hover Shield, attaches to any disposable mask.

Related link: https://zootility.com/

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Business, Free News Articles, Product Launches

Zootility Introduces Vaccinated Tags – Simplifying Compliance with New CDC Guidelines

PORTLAND, Maine -- Zootility, a design-driven US manufacturing company, announced the launch of wearable Vaccinated Tags, in response to the U.S. officials easing face mask guidance for COVID-19 vaccinated people.

The bar shaped pendants have a bold, easily readable "Vaccinated" message that allows others to be aware of the individual's vaccination status. The subtle size and minimalist style make it versatile and easy to wear, yet instantly recognizable. The pendants are made from 3mm sheets of stainless steel or solid brass, materials that are easy to care for and are durable.

This distinctive jewelry is laser cut in small batches and demonstrates the attention to detail and uniqueness of the product. Being a made-in-USA product, it supports jobs locally, assures quality, and ensures confidence in timely fulfillment.

"The most recent CDC guidelines lifted the outdoor mask-wearing mandate, both in recognition of the lower risk and to provide an incentive to get shots. With vaccinated people not needing to wear masks outdoors when knowing the vaccination status of others, social interactions in public or with friends, neighbors, coworkers, or classmates may create a lot of questions regarding vaccination status. With global vaccination efforts continuing to be strong, but with many still hesitant, we thought this jewelry would help start, or even avoid, potentially awkward conversations," says Nate Barr, Founder of Zootility.

Visit Zootility's website at http://vaccinatedtag.com/ to order a vaccinated tag or pendant for yourself or gift it to a loved one.

Zootility designs, launches, and manufactures exciting functional everyday products that solve interesting problems, using clever solutions, quality materials, and futuristic technology. For more information on Zootility, please visit http://www.zootility.com/.

*PHOTO link for media: https://www.Send2Press.com/300dpi/21-0428s2p-Zootility-vaxtag-300dpi.jpg

*Caption: Zootility's easily readable "Vaccinated" pendants and tags allow others to be aware of the individual's vaccination status.

Related link: https://zootility.com/

This news story was published by the Neotrope® News Network - all rights reserved.

Business, Free News Articles, Manufacturing, Product Launches

Zootility Launches a Comfortable Face Mask

PORTLAND, Maine -- Zootility, a design-driven US manufacturing company, launches a mask to provide comfort and protection to both those who are wearing masks just for a quick trip to the grocery store as well as essential workers who are masked 8+ hours per day. After a few revisions to the original design, the new Comfort Mask with a double layer of fabric helps keep out pesky allergens, airborne contaminants and unwanted germs.

Each Comfort Mask is laser cut. The stitch-free design creates a soft covering for the face. It stretches to conform better to all face shapes and attaches behind the ears with two adjustable-length ear loops. The unique folded design gives ample breathing room and contours tightly to the nose to help minimize fogging with glasses.

In a recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) study, the researchers found that wearing one mask - a disposable or cloth mask - blocked around 40% of test particles. When a cloth mask was worn on top of a disposable mask, about 80% of particles were blocked. When worn as a second mask for "double masking," Comfort Mask fits snugly and eliminates gaps around the sides of the face or nose when worn over a disposable mask.

"As a USA Made Manufacturer, we continue finding ways to respond to the worldwide crisis. We are all tired of wearing uncomfortable face masks yet we understand it's necessary to stay safe and keep our communities safe. Imagine that feeling you get when you put on a cozy pair of sweatpants? We designed our Comfort Mask to give the same feeling of comfort and safety when wearing it," says Nate Barr, Founder of Zootility.

The company is currently raising funds to support the launch of the Comfort Mask on Kickstarter. The project is running an early bird reward option at a discount for the next three days.

Backers can expect their masks shipped in March: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/zootility-health/comfort-mask-a-unique-twist-on-soft-and-safe-face-masks?ref=agksy5&token=362f8132

Zootility manufactures functional everyday objects in eccentric forms using quality materials and laser cutters to slowly create one at a time. From product design to manufacturing, Zootility produces everything in-house at their 10,000 sq-ft shop in Portland, Maine.

For more information on Zootility, please visit https://zootility.com/.

Press Contact
Nate Barr
Owner/Designer, Zootility
(207) 536-0639
nate@zootility.com

Zootility, 2301 Congress St, Suite 3, Portland, ME 04102

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Zootilitytools

*PHOTO link for media: https://www.Send2Press.com/300dpi/21-0218s2p-comfort-mask-300dpi.jpg

*Caption: Comfort Mask provides comfort and protection to both those who are wearing masks just for a quick trip to the grocery store as well as essential workers who are masked 8+ hours per day.

Related link: https://zootility.com/

This news story was published by the Neotrope® News Network - all rights reserved.

Business, Free News Articles, General Editorial

Will Lightning Death Count for U.S. Remain Unconfirmed?

CUMBERLAND, Maine -- Is there a connection between the number of lightning death reports and the COVID-19 pandemic? The National Lightning Safety Council (NLSC) is trying to find out. Amidst uncertainty surrounding the accurate (actual recorded) number of strike deaths in the U.S., members of the NLSC are wondering if the pandemic could be a factor in the reporting of lightning deaths in 2020.

"Our primary source for information on lightning deaths is from broadcast and print media reports," said John Jensenius, lightning specialist and founding member of the National Lightning Safety Council. "With this year's media coverage primarily focused on the COVID-19 pandemic, the election, social injustice and unrest, and the devastating wildfires in the western United States, lightning deaths and injuries did not get their usual news coverage."

Jane Elizabeth, a media consultant who has worked as an editor in several U.S. newsrooms including The Raleigh News & Observer and The Durham Herald-Sun, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, the Washington Post and others, agrees with Jensenius and notes that, "Information on lightning incidents may never have reached journalists. Public information officers and public officials who normally would notify local media about such incidents also may have been overwhelmed by the urgent events of 2020."

Elizabeth points out that according to the Poynter Institute, the pandemic has forced the closing of more than 60 newsrooms this year. And, per the New York Times, the pandemic and new ownership of news outlets has also led to layoffs, furloughs or pay cuts of roughly 37,000 media employees.

"Thus far in 2020, media reports have documented only 12 U.S. lightning deaths, but we've learned through other sources of five more," explained Jensenius. "We discovered two of those additional deaths recently from the Florida Department of Health vital statistics online database. It's worth noting that Florida is one of the few states that provide up-to-date death information online, so there are likely unreported lightning deaths in other states that we simply don't know about."

For decades, Jensenius has felt confident about the accuracy of statistical tracking and graphic chart notices for lightning safety awareness he posts online each year. Just as COVID-19 has dealt challenging wildcards to healthcare, science, industry and infrastructure, the NLSC's investigations to confirm lightning strike death counts have faced formidable roadblocks in 2020.

"Florida is the only state that I've been able to delve into, so it's a bit disconcerting to find this many lightning deaths that never made an online news report," said Jensenius. "As with many aspects of 2020, I'm not sure we'll have an accurate picture of lightning's impact anytime soon."

The NLSC invites educators, government officials and risk management experts to help build lightning safe communities by learning more about lightning safety and risk reduction. Visit the National Lightning Safety Council website for shareable information, resources and safety tips.

Inquiries about specific lightning concerns can also be addressed to Council members; find website contacts here: http://lightningsafetycouncil.org/LSC-About.html

Learn more at http://lightningsafetycouncil.org/LSC-Resources.html

Related link: http://lightningsafetycouncil.org/

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Business, Free News Articles

SIMEK’S is Now Offering Great Food for the Greater Good at Hannaford

SCARBOROUGH, Maine -- Mealtime just got better for you... and your community. Women-owned, family-favorite brand, SIMEK'S, is on a mission to deliver quality products that make mealtime easier, while also giving back to local communities, further expanding in the Northeast with Hannaford. SIMEK'S meatballs are flavorful, satisfying, and are free of preservatives, artificial colors and artificial flavors and are now available in the frozen meat aisle of Hannaford.

SIMEK'S doesn't just taste good, it does good. In addition to being committed to helping consumers put quality meals on their tables, they are equally committed to helping those less fortunate in local communities to do the same. Believing in the idea of Great Food for the Greater Good(TM), the company champions its One Gives One(TM) hunger-relief program in partnership with Feeding America. For every SIMEK'S product purchased, one meal is donated to the local Feeding America food bank, serving the community where the purchase was made. By the end of 2020, SIMEK'S anticipates donating a total of 4.5 million meals since the launch of One Gives One(TM).

A woman-owned, socially conscious company, SIMEK'S has evolved from local restaurant supplier, to specialty retailer, to fan-favorite grocery store label.

"We couldn't be more excited about our Hannaford debut and the prospect of delighting their customers and giving back to their community," says Lindsey Hickey, SIMEK'S president. "We hope to change consumers' perceptions about frozen foods when they try our delicious flavors and clean ingredients; see our fun, bold packaging; and connect with our social impact mission."

She adds, "Everything we prepare in our kitchen is guaranteed to be something that people will be proud to serve in theirs. We are passionate about providing convenient and quality products that do not sacrifice flavor."

So, Hannaford shoppers, meet your new favorite meatballs! All varieties come fully cooked and full of flavor. SIMEK'S products are all free from preservatives, artificial colors and artificial flavors.
The selection of meatballs now available in Hannaford stores include:
* Meatballs - Fully cooked, and perfect to serve as an entrée or appetizer!
o Original-Made with 100% beef and classic seasoning, great for any meal or recipe.
o Italian Style-Made with 100% beef and a zesty blend of Italian spices and cheeses seasons. They are perfection!
o Turkey-A tasty, healthy alternative to a classic favorite. So delicious you will not believe they are only 140 calories and gluten-free!

Stuck in a creative cooking rut? SIMEK'S website is a virtual meatball hall of fame, boasting an array of recipes and creative presentations. From suggestions ideal for family favorite dinners to homegating on football Sunday - inspiration abounds with SIMEK'S.

Learn more at: http://www.simeks.com/recipes/

About SIMEK'S:

SIMEK'S is a family and women-owned company, committed to providing Great Food for the Greater Good(TM). Since 1972, SIMEK'S has specialized in quality frozen food products consumers can be proud to serve their families. Today, the company offers all-natural lasagnas and fully cooked meatballs free from artificial colors, artificial flavors, and preservatives. The company champions its One Gives One(TM) hunger-relief program in partnership with Feeding America(r). For every SIMEK'S product sold, one meal is donated to the local Feeding America food bank, serving the community where the product was purchased. SIMEK'S anticipates donating 4.5 million meals by the end of 2020 - SIMEK'S doesn't just taste good, it does good.

Learn more at: http://www.simeks.com/

For more information, or to schedule a virtual cooking segment please contact:
Peggy Jackson
SIMEK'S Marketing Manager, Social + PR
651-491-5565
peggy.jackson@simeks.com

IMAGE LINKS FOR MEDIA:
[1] https://www.Send2Press.com/300dpi/20-1001s2p-lindsey-hickey-300dpi.jpg
Caption: Lindsey Hickey, SIMEK'S president.

[2] https://www.Send2Press.com/300dpi/20-1001s2p-simeks-meatballs-300dpi.jpg
Caption: SIMEK'S premium frozen meatballs.

Related link: http://www.simeks.com/

This news story was published by the Neotrope® News Network - all rights reserved.